For discussion:‘Finding faith for an unknown season’

Questions for reflecting on and discussing the feature article, 'Finding faith for an unknown season' (July 28, 2014 issue)

July 23, 2014 | Feature | Volume 18 Issue 15
By Barb Draper,

1. As Mennonite Church Canada ponders the future, it recognizes that the church is changing. What changes have been happening in your congregation? What fears do you have about the future of your congregation and the denomination? Is maintaining the status quo an option?

2. David Driedger says that claiming to have the final revelation of God’s truth is something “like idolatry.” Do you agree? Does showing respect for an opposing point of view diminish our integrity? Is unity in Christ possible if we disagree on some very deeply held convictions?

3. The report from the Being a Faithful Church Task Force says that most congregations want to be “more compassionate and welcoming of those individuals who are same-sex attracted.” Is this the attitude of your congregation? What does it mean to be more compassionate and welcoming? What are the advantages and disadvantages of having each congregation decide individually how welcoming to be?

4. Brian Quan suggests that when God reveals what the church should do, we will find ourselves between fear and awe, just as Peter did when he stepped out of the boat. Do you find this idea comforting or distressing? What next step is God suggesting for your church?

To see links to more Assembly content, go to Stories and images of Assembly 2014. 

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Regarding David Driedger's comment that "claiming to have the final revelation of God's truth is something 'like idolatry'": his comment is unsupported and dangerous.
Believing that the Holy Bible is the verbally inspired truth from God is nothing like idolatry. Idolatry is the worship of something or someone in place of worshipping God. To embrace the Word of God is an act of worship of God.
On the other hand, to reject it as the Word of God and truth and launch out into embracing self proclaimed modern men as superior purveyors of truth is more like idolatry.

"3. The report from the Being a Faithful Church Task Force says that most congregations want to be “more compassionate and welcoming of those individuals who are same-sex attracted.” Is this the attitude of your congregation? What does it mean to be more compassionate and welcoming? What are the advantages and disadvantages of having each congregation decide individually how welcoming to be?"

Our Congregation believes in having compassion and welcoming all people to attend our service and hear the "Good News" of Jesus Christ.
The Bible, the Holy Word of God, is clear in its instruction that as Christians we are to truly love all people and have compassion on them in their need. That love is expressed by seeking the eternal welfare and blessing of those people. The greatest harm that could come to anyone is to be judged by God and condemned to eternity in Hell for their sin, while the greatest good is to be saved from their sin and to receive the free gift of eternal life by the grace of God through faith in Jesus Christ. Therefore, we are to have compassion on all people because all people are equally sinners, and to invite them to repent of their sin and believe on the Lord Jesus Christ.

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